February 22, 2015

Four Years on Feb 22


I went out in the rain and collected flowers for the road cone. It's our pet road cone that we were given when the earthquake repairs were done on our house... but I will take the flowers to find a public one when I go out to lunch today.


We have made so much progress as a city. and still have so far to go. Life alternates between sadness for what we have lost and the excitement of getting out into the city and discovering the new places. There are new people in town and change is everywhere. You can mourn or get into the challenge so today I am doing both. A quiet reflective morning and then a vibrant lunch, with a large group of people from all over the world,  many of whom have moved here because of the earthquakes. I'm sure we will pause to reflect at 12.51 pm and raise a glass.


Ross Becker from CHCH EQ Photos did another aerial flight on Feb 15th - you can see the pictures in the albums on here.

Here is our area....
Horseshoe Lake Feb 2015

We live across the river on bottom left of photo.  A full community of houses almost gone now. 

On their facebook page Ross recently put this picture up of the progress in the city over the last 19 months -


 look at all the new builds....


Some of them are amazing...



Some clever interactive photos are also available to look at to show the changes:
http://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/news/christchurch-earthquake-2011/11241748/Christchurch-Then-and-now


We are still deciding on earthquake memorial designs... you can check out the choices http://www.stuff.co.nz/the-press/news/christchurch-earthquake-2011/66291618/Christchurch-earthquake-memorial-designs-unveiled
Which would you choose?
I quite like 3 and 4...

Next week a new documentary is being released   "The Day That Changed My Life"
A powerful, uncensored, insightful and life-affirming one-hour documentary special built around raw, heartfelt, never-seen-before, interviews captured in the immediate aftermath of the February 22nd 2011 earthquake in Christchurch.
These moving accounts give us a uniquely personal perspective on what it was really like to be at the forefront of the tragedy on that fateful day.
Woven together with gritty, hard-hitting, archive and stylish dramatic reconstructions The Day That Changed My Life creates a confronting, compelling and poignant story of how the day unfolded for the trapped, the searchers, the rescuers, the hopeful and the grief-stricken.
You can see the trailer at: http://www.thedaythatchangedmylife.co.nz/

Not sure what it will be like, but will give it a go. No matter how well prepared we think we are, are just watching the trailer has been hard enough. The sights and sounds take us back immediately and the feelings return. There are often tears. I usually record them so I can stop it and dip in and out. These things take time.

There have been some other good films made - you can see excerpts from them on this website:

Meanwhile we remember in our own ways.

Kia Kaha Christchurch


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